Tim Cook on privacy and sideloading

Tim Cook sulla privacy e il sideloading thumbnail

On the occasion of the opening speech of the IAPP Global Privacy Summit, Tim Cook he reflected on the issues of privacy and of confidence in the digital economy. These include the need to prevent regulations from forcing Apple to accept sideloading. Not surprisingly, the Apple CEO’s keynote began by defining the issue of privacy as one of the most fundamental of modern times. In this regard, Cook reported that there are two different realities concerning privacy itself. One that “unlocks humanity’s full creative potential”, and one in which “technology is exploited to rob humanity of what is fundamental: privacy itself”.

Tim Cook reflects on the collection of user data

“A world without privacy is less imaginative, less empathetic, less innovative. Less human “. So Tim Cook stated in IAPP’s Global Privacy Summit keynote, in which he defined privacy a fundamental right Apple constantly fights for. A battle that aims to protect users from data mining companies that use data provided by websites and apps. According to Cook, these companies argue that their work has “pure” intentions, even if in the end “they don’t believe we should have a choice on the matter “. Precisely for this reason, Apple has chosen to provide users with useful tools to defend their privacy. These include the ability to decide who should be allowed access to this tracking data.

The second battle of the company, however, concerns hacker e ransomware, actors dangerous for the safety of users. “We have long said that security is the foundation of privacy, because there is no privacy in a world where your private data can be stolen with impunity,” said Tim Cook publicly, highlighting Apple’s commitment to towards the safety of its users. On the other hand, it is undeniable that the company is working hard for regulate la data collection by users. “This is why personal data on the iPhone is encrypted by default.” So clarifies the CEO of Apple, pointing out that the data stored on iCloud is end-to-end encrypted“So not even Apple can watch them.”

Privacy e sideloading

During the keynote Tim Cook also focused on “Regulations that could jeopardize our privacy and security”. In this regard, the CEO says that Apple is in favor of privacy regulationof the support of the GDPR and the applause of countries with their own privacy laws. “We also continue to call for a strong and comprehensive privacy law in the United States. But we are deeply concerned about regulations that would undermine privacy and security in the service of some other goal. ” In this sense, Apple would be forced to approve apps that “evade the App Store”.

“This would allow data-hungry companies to bypass our privacy rules and once again track our users against their will.” In addition to allowing attackers to get around safety protections that Apple has implemented in its ecosystem. To clarify the idea, Tim Cook mentions the case of users who downloaded seemingly legitimate COVID-19 tracking apps, “only to find their devices infected with ransomware”. In this case, the iPhones have not suffered any damage, thanks to the defenses of the App Store. “When companies decide they want to leave the App Store because they want to exploit user data, this could put significant pressure on people to interact with alternative App Stores, where their privacy and security may not be protected.”

Therefore, if Apple were to enable third-party App Store on its platform, “the unwanted consequences will be profound”. In any case, hoping for a future where “technology empowers people without intruding on their lives and serves as a unifying force for good,” Cook says it’s a future “which together, I believe we have the power to achieve” .